Support

Foreign Language Articles write an article

Learning a language makes travel a more enriching cultural experience

Posted by farolitospanish on September 02, 2010

Learning a language makes travel a more enriching cultural experience
Spanish flag and globe

When a person travels they get to experience so many new things. But when a person learns a language of the location they are traveling to, it makes it a much more enriching cultural experience. You will be able to see more, do more and meet more people. By learning the language of the country you are visiting you are able to visit sites that not all tourists will be able to visit. You are able to walk into a museum and understand what is written. You can...

See all »


2000 characters remaining

LAPONT LANGUAGE CENTRE

Posted by LaPont Language Centre on June 13, 2011

LAPONT LANGUAGE CENTRE
LAPONT LANGUAGE CENTRE

 
Language lovers,,
Imagine This.. chatting with the locals while travelling'
talking about your family, work, country
the food you enjoy.
Lapont Language Centre has true international expertize in the delivery of language tuition.
FRENCH - SPANISH-...

See all »


2000 characters remaining

WHY SHOULD YOU LEARN A NEW LANGUAGE

Posted by LaPont Language Centre on August 22, 2011

WHY SHOULD YOU LEARN A NEW LANGUAGE
lpkid

FRENCH - SPANISH - ITALIAN - JAPANESE - MANDARIN CHINESE
Learning a second language will motivate you to venture beyond the usual boring tourist places, get to know the locals and add a new dimension to your travel.
School was never like this. At any stage in your life you can challenge yourself and have fun learning to speak a second Language.
Did you know that the best thing about learning...

See all »


2000 characters remaining

Learning a Second Language? Don't get fossilized!

Posted by Your Language Coach Cairns on January 31, 2013

Learning a Second Language? Don't get fossilized!

Fossilization in Second Language Acquisition:
Nature of the phenomenon and its implications on Second Language Acquisition
Introduction
The fundamental question, underlying every aspect of the phenomenon of Fossilization, is whether or not adult learners can ever achieve native likeness in their L2. While some researchers have long talked about the impossibility of reaching native like command in a second language (Gregg 1996 and Long 1990)[i], others argue that there is in fact a meaningful size of L2 learners who do attain native likeness (see. E.g. Birdsong, 1999, 2004). “The ultimate attainment of L2, if there is such a thing, thus shows two facets: success and failure”, Hahn[ii] states. As for the latter, while there are numerous reasons why learners would fail to achieve native like command in their L2, this Essay will be concerned with one type of non-learning: the construct of fossilization.
Nature of the Phenomenon
In 1972, Selinker and Lamendella provided the following explicit definition:
“Fossilization is the permanent cessation of IL learning before the learner has attained target language norms at all levels of linguistic structure and in all discourse domains in spite of the learner’s positive ability, opportunity or motivation to learn and acculturate into target language society”[iii].
We can derive several properties from this earliest definition of Fossilization: 1) The structures that are allegedly fossilized are persistent. 2) External influences are present but ineffective. 3) Fossilizable structures account for ‘all levels of linguistic structure’ and ‘all discourse domains’. 4) As the role of the learner’s cognitive abilities as well as ample motivation and opportunity is played down, the inevitability and resulting innateness of the phenomenon is made apparent.[iv]
Since Selinker’s postulation of the phenomenon, SLA literature has brought forth numerous definitions, views and conceptions concerning both the scope and nature of Fossilization. To make a note of all of them goes beyond the scope of this essay. In the light of the ‘inevitability’ of the phenomenon however, amongst all of the claims that have been made, Tarone’s is worth noting:
“A central characteristic of any interlanguage is that it fossilizes – that is, it ceases to develop at some point short of full identity with the target language” (Tarone 1994:1715)[v]
This statement implies that fossilization is an ultimate stage in the interlanguage process of every learner and thus, Hahn (2004) concludes, “fossilization is (…) taken to be ‘permanent stabilization’”[vi]
In the light of the various conceptions and keeping in mind that Hahn states that “to date, there is no uniform answer”[vii] to the question what exactly Fossilization is, we are able to deduce several features: (1) Fossilization involves premature cessation of development in defiance of optimal learning conditions; and (2) fossilizable structures are persistent over time, against any environmental influences, including consistent natural exposure to the target language and pedagogic interventions.[viii]
At this point it should be mentioned that any of the above stated definitions are fallible to a certain degree as they all raise two significant further, to date unanswered questions: 1) If fossilization is innate and therefore inevitable, then what are the processes that account for this innate “mechanism”[ix] and how and when is this mechanism activated? (See Han[x]). 2) Assuming a)that we cannot treat Fossilization in an isolated manner but having to relate it directly to stabilization, and assuming b) that the only difference between stabilization and fossilization is “permanence” (see Long[xi]) then what remains to be proven is how ‘permanent’ stabilization has to be and for how long before it qualifies for fossilization?
This very question leads us to another key issue surrounding the nature of fossilization:
Is fossilization a process or a product?
Before we can draw a conclusion, we have to consider the following underlying question: Do we approach fossilization from a cognitive perspective, a phenomenological perspective, or one that combines both?  In this assignment, I take the phenomenological point of view: Under such a phenomenological approach, I assume that Fossilization manifests itself as the state of “permanently frozen development”[xii], whether globally or locally (see below). As such, fossilization clearly points towards the qualities of a product and not a process. (See Han 2005) Definitions such as “(fossilization is) the long term persistence of plateaus of non-target-like structures in the interlanguage of non-native speakers…” (Selinker and Lakshmanan, 1992:197)[xiii]  have contributed...

See all »


2000 characters remaining

Is there a Critical Period for learning a Second Language?

Posted by Your Language Coach Cairns on January 31, 2013

Is there a Critical Period for learning a Second Language?

The extent to which the ability to acquire a first language is governed by age and the resulting hypothesis of a critical period during which a second language has to be acquired, is and has been heavily and widely debated in linguistics. While the critical period hypothesis has found extensive recognition amongst first language researchers, a critical period for second language acquisition is...

See all »


2000 characters remaining

The role of Sociolinguistics in Second Language Acquisition

Posted by Your Language Coach Cairns on January 31, 2013

The role of Sociolinguistics in Second Language Acquisition

Linguists have long depated and discussed the effect sociolinguistic factors have on second language acquisition. It is widely accepted these days, that sociolinguistics does influence 2nd language acquisition to a certain degree. According to Schumann, amongst all the various factors, the social- and psychological ones account for the two major casual factors, influencing a learner’s acquisition of a second language. He proposes the following sociolinguistic factors:
·         Social dominance
...

See all »


2000 characters remaining

Motivation as a factor in Second Language Acquisition

Posted by Your Language Coach Cairns on January 31, 2013

Motivation as a factor in Second Language Acquisition

Motivation, being the learner’s orientation towards the goal of learning a second language, is thought to make students more successful and more likely to acquire the target language. Unlike first language learners, for...

See all »


2000 characters remaining

How to Make Progress in Your Second Language Learning

Posted by Asian Language School on December 23, 2016

How to Make Progress in Your Second Language Learning
Learn Languages Online

Many of us are interested in learning a second language. It is usually on many people’s top 10 New Year’s resolution list. When we first started, we were greatly motivated. But many language learners do not go beyond the Beginner level. Why is that?
One of the main reasons is that language learners often feel discouraged when they feel like they are not progressing. Often, we set an unrealistic expectations on the timeframe to achieve fluency in the second language. It takes kids a few years before they can learn to speak their first language coherently with daily guidance and encouragement from adults at home. Similarly, language learners must be patient, at the same time, exert continued effort in studying the second language.
Relying on once-a-week language lessons and a textbook is not enough to master a second language. Outside classroom hours, learners need to set aside some time to review the lessons and go through additional materials to build their language skills.
Here are 5 easy ways you can do to quickly improve your language skills:
1....

See all »


2000 characters remaining

I want to learn this

I'm an expert at this

Online Foreign Language Classes

New Foreign Language Classes